Is Lymphoma Curable

Is Lymphoma Curable

Since there are many different lymphomas, the curability of each case will vary.

When lymphoma is caught in an early stage, the cure rate is higher.

However, the overall cure rate for all lymphomas, in both men and women, are quite high.

Cure Rates Based On Stage Of Detection

Localized (Still in one location, has not metastasized)Accounts for 38% of all cases; 5-year survival rate is 82.1%

Distant (Metastasis has occured)45% of all lymphoma cases are of this variety. 59.9% is the 5-year survival rate.

Regional (has spread to the regional lymph nodes77.5% is the cure rate and this type accounts for 19 of all lymphoma cases.

Unknown (Unstaged)67.5% cure rate accounting for 8% of cases.

There are a plethora of types of NHL (Non-Hodgkin lymphoma) and the possibility of cure is dependent on the specific diagnosis.

Prognosis can also be different even in the same sub type of NHL.

Even in an individual who has a well-categorized case of lymphoma, the survival rate and time can be hard to guess.

Is lymphoma curable for anybody?

Cure rates depend greatly on many factors.

Thus, the answer is yes and no because it depends on what type of lymphoma one has, what lymphoma stages it may be in, the lymphoma grade, the general health of the patient, response to treatment and of course a dash of luck.

For people with quick growing lymphomas types (for example, diffuse large B cell lymphoma), the lymphoma can be potentially resolved with combination chemotherapy.

However, for those individuals who respond poorly to treatment or have an early relapse, the lymphoma can be deadly in a rather short period of time.

The slowly growing lymphomas are incurable with regular chemo, yet patients can live with them for years and years.

Much of deciding how to treat a specific lymphoma is based on simply observing the patient closely to see how the disease progresses so that an appropriate course of action can be prescribed.

Lymphoma Treatment

Is Lymphoma curable with chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, bone marrow transplants, etc?

Typically, one or a combination of these treatments will be used, depending upon the factors discussed above.